Over the past few weeks the website’s Testimony page has been redesigned and several riders that took part in this year’s Rolling Barrage contributed to their testimony / story.

Actually, it was their testimonies and stories which led more to the redesign of that specific page, which led to further development on the website. More on that in another blog post at a later date.

Doing something like The Rolling Barrage takes a level of courage, determination, resilience and many more factors, whether it be one leg or The Full Pull. To then tell your story adds an entirely different level.

I have had the privilege of being the caretaker of their testimony and stories and ensured that edits were more aligned to the odd spelling, grammar or paragraph structure change. But their words, testimony, story are all there.

Some testimonies are longer than others. Does it matter? No. They are all powerful in their own right. Reading them, you will probably experience a range of motions, much like I did working them into the design of the Testimony page. For me, it brought back so many memories of The Rolling Barrage over the years and all the places I have been to, people I met, the experiences and changes in others and myself.

The testimonies and stories come from a wide range of people. Women, men, veterans, first responders, and supporters. Many of you who will read their words, their stories, some of you will know who they are. Many of you will have possibly shared a bond of service in some capacity. Many of you, while reading them, are going to cry, laugh, nod at things written that you understand, relate to, or even experienced yourselves.

You are possibly going to remember some things from your own past. You may even have to step away from reading to balance yourself. However, return. For the courage to continue is just as important as their courage to write what they wrote. Their journey, healing, and stories can be yours too.

Read their Testimony / Story / Journey

Regards,

Christian aka Opie

The Rolling Barrage PTSD Foundation / The Rolling Barrage

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